Press Room

CONTACTS

Tracy Carluccio, Delaware Riverkeeper Network, 215.369.1188 ext. 104

Iris Marie Bloom, Protecting Our Waters, 215.840.6489

Adam Garber, PennEnvironment, 215.732.5897

Matt Walker, Clean Air Council, 215.567.4004 ext. 121

Karen Feridun, Berks Gas Truth, 610.678.7726


PRESS RELEASES

For Immediate Release

September 24, 2013

Contacts:          Tracy Carluccio, Delaware Riverkeeper Network, 215.692.2329

Iris Marie Bloom, Protecting Our Waters, 215.840.6489

Karen Feridun, Berks Gas Truth, 610.678.7726

Adam Garber, PennEnvironment, 267.515.1220

Matt Walker, Clean Air Council 215.567.4004 x 121

Shale Gas Outrage September 24 to 26th Kicks Off

65 Organizations Pitch in for Water Drive;

The days ahead hold press conference, water truck send-off and conference

Philadelphia, PA – On Tuesday September 24th at 12:00 noon, jugs of water and donations will begin to flow into the hands of groups who are collecting water to give to Pennsylvania residents whose water has been polluted by gas drilling.  People will drop off jugs of drinking water and checks to buy clean water at the Arch Street United Methodist Church, 55 N. Broad Street, Philadelphia PA. 

The Water Drive will continue through to Thursday, September 26th, at 9:30 a.m. Trucks will be loaded that morning to deliver the water to families in counties where their well water is not drinkable because of pollution caused gas drilling operations, and will be given a rousing send off at a press conference at 9:30 a.m. at the Church.

Water wells throughout gas extraction regions in the state have been contaminated by drilling.  PA Department of Environmental Protection admits to 161 cases of private water well contamination as a result of gas drilling operations between 2008 and September 2012.  That number – already a year old — refers to contamination incidents, not individual wells or the number of families impacted. Many people whose wells have been contaminated have been left to their own devices to replace their water.  Replacing water for a family of four can cost in the neighborhood of $12,000 in the first year alone — a cost that is difficult, and for many, impossible, to bear.

In an effort to help these neighbors in impacted communities across the state, water drives are being organized to do what the industry responsible for the contamination and the government failed to do — get people the clean water they need.

The Shale Gas Outrage Water Drive is being held directly across the street from the Pennsylvania Convention Center where industry insiders are celebrating their annual Marcellus Shale Insight get-together on the same days, in view of conference goers.  The public is invited to donate water and funds at the Church from noon to 6:30 p.m. Tuesday; 8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Wednesday; and up until 9:30 a.m. on Thursday.

Shale Gas Outrage will illustrate very publicly that people will step up to replace the clean water that gas drilling took away; but the industry will be held accountable for the pollution they have caused.  “The True Cost of Fracking”, an examination of gas extraction and its complex infrastructure, will be the subject of the Freedom from Fracking conference to be held on Thursday September 26, from 1:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at the Friends Center a few blocks away.  This event will close out the third annual Shale Gas Outrage.

“This year’s Shale Gas Outrage Water Drive and Freedom from Fracking conference are shining a light on the true costs of fracking. They are the entries you’ll never see on a balance sheet because they’re not numbers. They’re stories of individuals, families, even entire communities everywhere fracking is being done. They’re real life accounts everyone needs and deserves to hear,” said Karen Feridun, Founder, Berks Gas Truth.

Iris Marie Bloom, Director, Protecting Our Waters, said, “With flaring 500 feet from children’s schools, hundreds of cases of poisoned water, and families being silenced by gag orders when their air, water and health are impacted — and with the climate crisis at 5 minutes to midnight — we are here to say ‘stop fracking now!’  We don’t have to be back here next year getting more clean water for people impacted by this extreme extraction!”

Maya K. van Rossum, the Delaware Riverkeeper, representing Delaware Riverkeeper Network, said, “It is morally wrong that in the pursuit of more dirty fossil fuel energy, industrial profits, and political jockeying, real people are losing their access to clean water.  This week we’re collecting and will send water to Pennsylvania people and families who have lost their drinking water to the gas industry.  Tomorrow it could be our neighbors to the north, south or east collecting and sending water to us here in Philadelphia and the Delaware River Watershed if drilling gets allowed.  It is time to draw a line in the sand – and for all people to band together in defense of one another to say it is time to stop the fracking and drilling in every watershed and every community.”

“With the gas drilling industry and our elected officials failing to step in and protect families from toxic drinking water due to fracking, people from across the Commonwealth have had to do so. We hope one day clean water drives like this one will no longer be necessary—but that will take significant shift in state policy,” stated Adam Garber, Field Director, PennEnvironment.

“The shale gas industry in Pennsylvania is run amok, and regulators are not enforcing even the minimal rules we have on the books to protect air quality and public health. While the industry touts shale gas as a clean-burning fossil fuel, every stage of shale gas extraction emits harmful air pollution. Clean Air Council stands in solidarity with local leaders in shale-field areas working to take back their quality of life from the impacts of the shale gas industry. The Freedom from Fracking Conference this Thursday will provide an opportunity for leaders from rural Pennsylvania and the Philadelphia area to learn and strategize together on how to tackle fracking related pollution,” said Matt Walker, Community Outreach Director with Clean Air Council.

Shale Gas Outrage is a community effort supported by organizations and members of the public.  The mission statement is: Shale gas development contaminates our communities’ air and water, harming human health and living ecosystems. It distracts us from taking the immediate steps essential to curb climate change. Building a thriving economy requires us to create green jobs, develop sustainable energy, and ensure a healthy environment. Therefore, we are committed to stopping fracking now, including maintaining and expanding each moratorium and ban already established. We are also committed to fighting for justice in place of the unacceptable and unequal burdens imposed by the shale gas industry upon vulnerable populations and future generations.

For more information about Shale Gas Outrage, the Water Drive and the Freedom from Fracking 3 Conference go to: https://shalegasoutrage.wordpress.com/

For background information on these issues that Shale Gas Outrage is addressing go to: https://shalegasoutrage.files.wordpress.com/2013/09/backgrounder-final-9-23-13.pdf

Sponsors of Shale Gas Outrage Water Drive and Freedom from Fracking 3 Conference September 24-26, 2013 are, in alphabetical order:

Berks Gas Truth

Clean Air Council

Delaware Riverkeeper Network

PennEnvironment

Protecting Our Waters

Endorsers of this year’s Shale Gas Outrage events are, in alphabetical order:

350 Berks & Lehigh Valley Climate Action

350NJ

Allegheny Defense Project

Athens County Fracking Action Network

Arlington TX Barnett Shale Blogger

Catskill Citizens for Safe Energy

Catskill Mountainkeeper

Center for Biological Diversity

Clean Water Action

Clean Water Action (Central PA)

CWA Local 1081

Defenders of the Earth Outreach Mission

Don’t Frack Roaming Shores Village, Ohio

Earthworks

Endless Mountains Earth First!

Environeers

Food & Water Watch

Frack Free Catskills

Fracking in Northeast Pennsylvania

Fracking Truth Alliance of Lawrence and Mercer Counties

Fresh Water Accountability Project Ohio

Freshlife, Inc.

The Front Yard Farmer, LLC

Gas Drilling Awareness Coalition

Gas Truth of Central PA

Gasland

Genesis Farm

Grassroots Coalition for Environmental and Economic Justice

Green Party Of Delaware County

Green Party of Pennsylvania

Greenpeace

HoCo Climate Change 

Hudson Valley Earth First!

Lehigh Valley Gas Truth

Marcellus Outreach Butler

Marcellus Protest

Marcellus Shale Earth First! Network

Mountain Watershed Association

North Jersey Public Policy Network

Northeast Philly for Peace and Justice

Pascack Sustainability Group

Peach Bottom Concerned Citizens

Pennsylvania Alliance for Clean Water and Air

Pennsylvania Association of Staff Nurses and Allied Professionals

Pennsylvania Federation BMWED – Teamsters

Physicians for Social Responsibility Philadelphia

Public Citizen

Responsible Drilling Alliance

Sane Energy Project

Save Our Streams PA

Shale Justice

The Shalom Center

Sierra Club, New Jersey Chapter

Sierra Club, Pennsylvania Chapter

Stop Fracking PA!

Swarthmore Mountain Justice

Tour de Frack

TripleDivideFilm.org (Melissa Troutman and Joshua Pribanic)

United for Action

United Sludge Free Alliance

###

Download the release here:

SGO_Water_Drive_Kick-Off_09-24-2013


Shale Gas Outrage Water Drive – Why we are collecting and delivering clean water

Philadelphia’s Water Drive

Last May, the Scranton Times-Tribune ran Laura Legere’s investigative report that revealed that the state’s Department of Environmental Protection had determined that 161 private water wells had been contaminated as a result of gas drilling operations. Weeks earlier, departing DEP Secretary Michael Krancer had stated in a correspondence to several environmental organizations that the number was 25, and that was up from the number he’d been giving for years, 0.

The article noted that the agency, by its own admission, does a poor job of maintaining records of contaminated wells. A number of the records the DEP did manage to retrieve indicated that testing was inconclusive and no records have been produced to indicate that any of those cases have been resolved. In fact, the retrieved records are already one year old, they span only the period from 2008 through the fall of 2012 and refer to contamination incidents, not individual wells or number of families impacted.

In short, as stunning as the number 161 is, there’s every reason to believe that it’s just the tip of the iceberg and there’s no reason to believe we know how many people have suffered as a result.

What we do know is that many of the people whose wells have been contaminated have been left to their own devices to replace their water.  Replacing water for a family of four can cost in the neighborhood of $12,000 in the first year alone, a cost that is difficult, and for many, impossible, to bear.

Neighbors in impacted communities across the state stepped in to do what the industry responsible for the contamination and the government failed to do by helping their neighbors get the clean water they need. This summer, anti-fracking activists across the state started a campaign called localSTAND (bit.ly/localSTAND) to support those efforts.

The Shale Gas Outrage Water Drive is, by far, the largest localSTAND event to date. Others have included a small fundraising concert, bake sales, flea market stands, and donation jars in restaurants and shops. The idea of localSTAND is simple. Our campaign’s goal is to help provide water to impacted Pennsylvanians by raising funds that go to those community groups who know their local needs best and know how best to allocate the funds.

Our Planet’s Water Crisis

Worldwide we are facing water problems.  Potable water supplies are particularly in jeopardy due to depletion of water resources and water quality degradation that result from the way we use water, how much we use, and how we treat the watersheds that feed our streams and rivers.  Stresses on our water resources are likely to be exacerbated by climate change.[1]  Climate change impacts are exacerbating global scale water supply and demand imbalances[2] that can be expected to worsen unless dramatic changes are made to curb current projections.

In the United States current trends in water consumption are making matters worse by expanding the footprint of shale gas development.  A recent report published by Ceres[3] examines water use for hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) in the U.S. and warns that growing pressure for fracking is severely straining regions such as Texas and Colorado, which have experienced drought in recent years.  The report showed that 65.8 billion gallons of water was consumed by fracking, equal to the water use of 2.5 million Americans for a year.[4]  Much of the fracking is located in regions under high or extremely high water stress, identified by the Water Resource Institute’s Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas.[5]   Even in the wetter Marcellus Shale region, water consumed by fracking can have substantial impacts locally on subwatersheds.  For instance, last summer, the Susquehanna River Basin Commission suspended 64 separate withdrawals from the Susquehanna River Watershed due to low flow conditions caused by prolonged drought[6].

Considering that only 1% of the earth’s water is drinkable, how we manage water will define our future and the future of the planet.  Since 99% of that water is groundwater[7], how we look after our aquifers is the most critical component involved.  Let’s look at how fracking consumes water and how it pollutes water – both are major stressors that are endangering our drinking water and environment.

Water Consumed:  Fracking is a water intensive process requiring an average 5 million gallons of water per well and up to 9 million gallons for some of the longest well bores.  Between 8-10% of the volume injected in Pennsylvania’s Marcellus Shale wells returns to the surface as flowback.  That means up to 90% of the fresh water injected in the fracking process is sequestered in deep geologic formations.

This depletion is fundamentally different than evaporative losses for agriculture, electricity generation, and recreational uses like golf courses, which essentially recycle the water used into the atmosphere where it returns as precipitation.  Water injected for fracking is locked away from the earth’s natural hydrologic cycle, a total loss that doesn’t return to its source.

The ecological and socio-economic implications of this true consumptive loss have not been studied or quantified, but considering the finite nature of potable water and our expanding consumption rate, this must be recognized by water managers as a key in assessing fracking’s water footprint and setting gas extraction policies. Very little data exists to quantify groundwater in many aquifers so that accurate water footprint accounting is difficult to develop.[8]  And yet the trajectory we are on must be exposed in order to change course so we have to gather that data and do the needed analyses.

Water Polluted: The other way fresh water is depleted is through pollution.  Frack water is deliberately polluted by the addition of frack chemicals and inadvertently but inescapably contaminated by contact with naturally occurring highly toxic pollutants where the shale gas is contained.  Chemical additives make up to 2% of the frack fluid injected in gas extraction.[9]  Up to 750 chemicals have been used across the nation in frack fluids[10]; in Pennsylvania and West Virginia 322 unique chemicals and at least another 21 additional compounds whose ingredients are kept secret by drillers have been documented in frack fluids used in the Marcellus Shale.[11]  Many of these chemical additives are toxic and are known carcinogens and endocrine disruptors; long term exposure can cause nervous system, respiratory and organ damage.  Some, such as benzene, are so dangerous that even miniscule amounts can cause disease.[12]

But even if only benign additives were used for fracking, the water that returns to the surface is highly toxic, polluted with materials found in the shale formations[13].  Many of these materials, including sodium, chloride, bromide, arsenic, barium, and naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM)[14] are found at levels that exceed safe drinking water standards.  Radioactivity in Marcellus Shale wastewater is higher than in non-Marcellus formations and positively correlates with Total Dissolved Solids, showing very high salinities.[15]  Radionuclides have been flagged as problematic in Pennsylvania frack wastewater by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency[16] and sampling by New York State revealed several radionuclides, including radium 226[17], the longest lived isotope of radium with a half-life of 1600 years.  Radium 226 can cause lymphoma, bone cancer and blood formation diseases such as leukemia and plastic anemia.  Radon is the radioactive decay product of radium; it is an extremely dangerous gas and is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States.[18]

A recent report by the U.S. General Accountability Office concludes that the water produced by shale fracking poses health risks to humans and the environment.[19]  A Risk Analysis released in August of this year concluded that five main contamination pathways for frack fluids exist and even in a best-case scenario, an individual well would potentially release at least 200 cubic meters of contaminated[20] fluids (cubic meter= ~264.17 fluid gallons).[21]  Multiplied by the 100,000 new shale gas wells that the U.S. Dept. of Energy says can be expected nationally and it is quickly evident that lots of water will be contaminated by fracking, depleting clean water resources – at least 5 billion gallons using these estimates.

Right Here at Home: Looking locally, the numbers are more startling. Consider the compact geography where pollutants would be released and water would be withdrawn: Pennsylvania predicts 50,000 new gas wells, New York predicts 40,000.  The Delaware River Basin alone may range between 32,000 and 64,000 new gas wells drilled. The Delaware River Watershed is already supplying 17 million people with water, one of the largest water supply watersheds in the mid-Atlantic even though it is a relatively small watershed (~13,000 sq. miles).  How will this demand continue to be met if the currently high quality water is degraded and depleted?

It doesn’t end there.  Much of the disposal of frack wastewater in Pennsylvania is still going to surface waters according to a report from a New York university[22], spreading the pollution even farther because many of the pollutants in the wastewater are not removed.  Frack wastewater processed by municipal wastewater treatment systems could be categorized as “nontreatment” because these systems are not designed to clean this waste.[23]  In Ohio, permanent damage caused by earthquakes induced by injection of frack wastewater have led to a moratorium on re-injection near Youngstown, but the irreversible pollution of groundwater resources there is still under study.  And findings by hydrogeologists Paul Rubin[24], Tom Myers[25] and Cornell Professor Tony Ingraffea have verified that gas wells can and do leak, some immediately, some in a few years’ time.  Paul Rubin makes it clear that eventually all gas wells being constructed today will leak methane and/or polluted fluids into aquifers, assuring the loss and degradation of irreplaceable water in untold volumes.[26]  That’s unending loss, a suffocating footprint that cannot be undone and that deprives generations to come.

As clean water is contaminated, it loses its place in the natural healthy systems within which it functions, depleting the resource, expanding shale gas’ water footprint. Here in the Delaware River Watershed, water supplies contribute 3.82 billion dollars in annual value to the regional economy and water quality brings $2.5M in annual economic benefit to the Basin, according to a study out of the University of Delaware.[27]  When water is polluted, it costs to clean it up to drinking water standards, reducing its value, bringing real economic burdens.

Air Quality and Public Health Impacts

The number of fracked wells in Pennsylvania continues to rise, and the infrastructure used to move gas to markets or burn it for electricity is moving forward at breakneck speed. Shale gas is touted as a cleaner-burning fossil fuel than coal, but every stage of natural gas extraction, production and delivery causes local and regional air pollution.

After drilling a well, gas is usually burned off at the well pad, emitting high amounts of smog-forming and cancer-causing pollutants. Hundreds of tons of air toxics are emitted each year by massive engines at compressor stations, facilities used to transport gas through pipelines. Some of these pollutants are known carcinogens and have been linked to devastating neurological and developmental issues, brain damage, liver and kidney damage. A similar mix of pollutants are emitted by diesel engines used to drill, frack, and move massive amounts of materials. Exposure to diesel exhaust can cause headaches and nausea, respiratory disease, and lung cancer. Smog has been linked with a variety of respiratory diseases and is associated with cancer, stroke and premature death.

Shale gas is also touted by the industry and elected officials as a solution to climate change. The overall climate change footprint of shale gas is potentially twice as great as coal over a twenty year timeframe. Methane (or natural gas) is 105 times more potent at warming our planet than carbon dioxide. The gas industry leaks anywhere from 3 ½ to 9 percent of the gas it produces. Efforts by the industry to use better technologies to reduce methane leakage and pollution are laudable, but ultimately only act as a band-aid on the pollution problem rather than tackling the root.

Earlier this year, Research and Development (RAND), a non-profit global think tank, published a paper estimating the total damages caused by air pollution from the shale gas industry in Pennsylvania. The study found that damages from extraction activities ranged between $7.2 and $32 million dollars. Health impacts like increased asthma, hospitalization, and premature death and impacts to agriculture and infrastructure made up the majority of damages. Compressor stations accounted for 60–75% of the total costs.

According to the study, pollution from shale gas equipment currently makes up a small fraction of the Commonwealth’s total, damages are especially bad in locations with a high density of shale gas operations.  According to the report,  “In those locations, the sum total of net emissions increases may be equivalent to adding a major new source of pollution even though individual sources of emissions are likely to be regulated as minor sources.” The RAND study assumed 200 compressor stations were operating, while the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PA DEP) found that 150 stations were operating in 2011. Clean Air Council recently found that, according to PA DEP air permits, Pennsylvania has almost 1000 stations.  Since the gas industry is currently only at a fraction of what some estimates are forecasting, air pollution from shale gas sources will continue to encompass an ever-growing portion of Pennsylvania’s pollution mix.

PA DEP has attempted to show a good-faith effort in studying or curbing air pollution in the Commonwealth, but new permit requirements and current air monitoring leave a lot to be desired. PA DEP released the new General Permit 5, or GP-5, this past year, claiming that it would result in reduced air pollution. In reality, the new permit only matches what the industry has already been doing for the past two years.  PA DEP’s current one-year air monitoring of shale gas facilities in southwest Pennsylvania will yield questionable results due to the lack of sufficient data points among other issues. The Department’s emissions inventory may have undercounted the number of operating compressor stations by a factor of five.  Because of PA DEP’s continued underestimation of the severity of impacts caused by the shale gas industry, residents in shale-field areas have stopped relying on PA DEP to provide protection and have started using their own strategies to improve their quality of life.

We Cannot Live without Water and Air

Shale Gas Outrage is a community effort supported by organizations and members of the public.  The mission statement is: Shale gas development contaminates our communities’ air and water, harming human health and living ecosystems. It distracts us from taking the immediate steps essential to curb climate change. Building a thriving economy requires us to create green jobs, develop sustainable energy, and ensure a healthy environment. Therefore, we are committed to stopping fracking now, including maintaining and expanding each moratorium and ban already established. We are also committed to fighting for justice in place of the unacceptable and unequal burdens imposed by the shale gas industry upon vulnerable populations and future generations.

For more information about Shale Gas Outrage, the Water Drive and the Freedom from Fracking 3 Conference go to: https://shalegasoutrage.wordpress.com/

Sponsors of Shale Gas Outrage Water Drive and Freedom from Fracking 3 Conference September 24-26, 2013 are, in alphabetical order:

Berks Gas Truth

Clean Air Council

Delaware Riverkeeper Network

PennEnvironment

Protecting Our Waters

Endorsers of this year’s Shale Gas Outrage events are, in alphabetical order:

350 Berks & Lehigh Valley Climate Action

350NJ

Allegheny Defense Project

Athens County Fracking Action Network

Arlington TX Barnett Shale Blogger

Catskill Citizens for Safe Energy

Catskill Mountainkeeper

Center for Biological Diversity

Clean Water Action

Clean Water Action (Central PA)

CWA Local 1081

Defenders of the Earth Outreach Mission

Don’t Frack Roaming Shores Village, Ohio

Earthworks

Endless Mountains Earth First!

Environeers

Food & Water Watch

Frack Free Catskills

Fracking in Northeast Pennsylvania

Fracking Truth Alliance of Lawrence and Mercer Counties

Fresh Water Accountability Project Ohio

Freshlife, Inc.

The Front Yard Farmer, LLC

Gas Drilling Awareness Coalition

Gas Truth of Central PA

Gasland

Genesis Farm

Grassroots Coalition for Environmental and Economic Justice

Green Party Of Delaware County

Green Party of Pennsylvania

Greenpeace

HoCo Climate Change 

Hudson Valley Earth First!

Lehigh Valley Gas Truth

Marcellus Outreach Butler

Marcellus Protest

Marcellus Shale Earth First! Network

Mountain Watershed Association

North Jersey Public Policy Network

Northeast Philly for Peace and Justice

Pascack Sustainability Group

Peach Bottom Concerned Citizens

Pennsylvania Alliance for Clean Water and Air

Pennsylvania Association of Staff Nurses and Allied Professionals

Pennsylvania Federation BMWED – Teamsters

Physicians for Social Responsibility Philadelphia

Public Citizen

Responsible Drilling Alliance

Sane Energy Project

Save Our Streams PA

Shale Justice

The Shalom Center

Sierra Club, New Jersey Chapter

Sierra Club, Pennsylvania Chapter

Stop Fracking PA!

Swarthmore Mountain Justice

Tour de Frack

TripleDivideFilm.org (Melissa Troutman and Joshua Pribanic)

United for Action

United Sludge Free Alliance


[2] Monika Freyman and Ryan Salmon, Ceres, “Hydraulic Fracturing and Water Stress: Growing Competitive Pressures for Water”, May 2013.

[3] Ibid.

[4] Ibid., page 6.

[5] Ibid., page 4.

[7] Tom Gleeson, et.al., “Water balance of global aquifers revealed by groundwater footprint”, published on line 6.1.12.

[8] Tom Gleeson, et.al., “Water balance of global aquifers revealed by groundwater footprint”, published on line 6.1.12.

[9] New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Revised Draft Supplemental Generic Environmental Impact Statement on the Oil, Gas, and Solution Mining Regulatory Program, Well Permit Issuance for Horizontal Drilling and High-Volume Hydraulic Fracturing to Develop the Marcellus Shale and other Low-Permeability Gas Reservoirs, September 2011, p. 5-40.

[10] Rozell, D.I. and Reaven, S.J. (2012), “Water Pollution Risk Associated with Natural Gas Extraction from the Marcellus Shale. Risk Analysis”, 32:1382-1393. Doi:10.1111/j.1539-6924.2011.01757.x

[11] New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Revised Draft Supplemental Generic Environmental Impact Statement on the Oil, Gas, and Solution Mining Regulatory Program, Well Permit Issuance for Horizontal Drilling and High-Volume Hydraulic Fracturing to Develop the Marcellus Shale and other Low-Permeability Gas Reservoirs, September 2011, p. 5-41.

[13] US General Accountability Office, Information on the Quantity, Quality, and Management of Water Produced During Oil and Gas Production, GAO-12-56, January 2012.

[14]Rozell, D.I. and Reaven, S.J. (2012), “Water Pollution Risk Associated with Natural Gas Extraction from the Marcellus Shale. Risk Analysis”, 32:1382-1393. Doi:10.1111/j.1539-6924.2011.01757.x

[15] Rowen et.al., Radium Content of Oil- and Gas-Field Produced Waters in the Northern Appalachian Basin (USA): Summary and Discussion of Data, US Geologic Survey, Scientific Investigations Report 2011-5135.

[16]USEPA letter from Shawn M. Garvin, Regional Administrator to The Honorable Michael Krancer, Acting Secretary, PADEP, 3.7.11.

[17] New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Revised Draft Supplemental Generic Environmental Impact Statement on the Oil, Gas, and Solution Mining Regulatory Program, Well Permit Issuance for Horizontal Drilling and High-Volume Hydraulic Fracturing to Develop the Marcellus Shale and other Low-Permeability Gas Reservoirs, September 2011, Table 5.24.

[19]US General Accountability Office, Information on the Quantity, Quality, and Management of Water Produced During Oil and Gas Production, GAO-12-56, January 2012.

[20] “contaminated” is defined as potentially exceeding the limits of the U.S. Clean Water Act or Safe Drinking Water Act.

[21]Rozell, D.I. and Reaven, S.J. (2012), “Water Pollution Risk Associated with Natural Gas Extraction from the Marcellus Shale. Risk Analysis”, 32:1382-1393. Doi:10.1111/j.1539-6924.2011.01757.x

[22] Ibid.

[23] Ibid.

[24]Paul Rubin, Report for the Delaware River Basin Commission on Natural Gas Development Regulations December 9, 2010, Article 7 of Part III – Basin Regulations, 2011.

[25]Tom Myers, “Potential Contaminant Pathways from Hydraulically Fractured Shale to Aquifers”, Ground Water, National Ground Water Association. doi: 10.1111/j.1745-6584.2012.00933.x

[26]Paul Rubin, Report for the Delaware River Basin Commission on Natural Gas Development Regulations December 9, 2010, Article 7 of Part III – Basin Regulations, 2011.

[27] Gerald J. Kauffman, Socioeconomic Value of the Delaware River Basin in Delaware, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania”, University of Delaware, 10.11.11, p. 26.

Download our backgrounder here:

Shale Gas Outrage Water Drive – Why we are collecting and delivering clean water


MEDIA ADVISORY

For Immediate Release: September 19th, 2013

Contact: Tracy Carluccio, Delaware Riverkeeper Network, 215.692.2329
Iris Marie Bloom, Protecting Our Waters, 215.840.6489
Karen Feridun, Berks Gas Truth, 610.678.7726
Adam Garber, PennEnvironment, 267.515.1220

AS FRACKING MORATORIUM MOVEMENT BUILDS, PHILADELPHIA HOSTS WATER DRIVE AND FREEDOM FROM FRACKING CONFERENCE

Pointing to thousands of fracking well pads underwater in Colorado, the proposed Los Angeles moratorium on fracking, and the growing support for a Pennsylvania statewide moratorium, organizers expose the true cost of fracking next week in Philadelphia.

Freedom from Fracking Conference schedule, registration

PRESS CONFERENCE Thursday, September 26th 2013

When: 9:30 AM – 10:30 AM including speakers, Q and A, Water Drive send-off
Where: Arch Street Methodist Church, 55 N. Broad Street, Philadelphia PA 19107

SHALE GAS OUTRAGE WATER DRIVE, SEPT. 24th – 26th

While shale industry insiders and public officials meet inside the Philadelphia Convention Center from September 24th through September 26th, anti-fracking organizations will be outside collecting jugs of water and cash contributions to purchase water for Pennsylvanians who have lost their water by drilling operations. You can also donatehere, or through the link in our sidebar.

Where: Arch St. United Methodist Church, Philadelphia, PA 19107
When: Starts September 24th at 12pm; concludes on September 26th at 10:30am when the water is sent to impacted Pennsylvanians
Visuals: Donated water jugs marked with messages from donors; signs, banners, volunteers loading water onto a truck, residents impacted by fracking

FREEDOM FROM FRACKING CONFERENCE, SEPT. 26th

The conference theme is the True Cost of Fracking. Panels and keynotes will focus on the toxic impacts of shale gas development in Pennsylvania and beyond, and how we can stop it.

Where: Friends Center, 1501 Cherry Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107
When: 2 p.m. to 8 PM on Thursday, September 26th

Keynote speaker: John Fenton is a Pavillion, Wyoming farmer and rancher whose waterwas impacted by fracking. The impacts on his land and life were poignantly captured by director Josh Fox in his Gasland documentaries. Fenton will advocate for the EPA’s investigation into water contamination in Pavillion, abruptly stopped earlier this year, to be reopened.

Conference sessions will include:

  • Understanding the economic costs of fracking
  • Health impacts of fracking
  • Reports from people in impacted communities
  • Air, climate, & health impacts of shale gas infrastructure and possible solutions
  • The need for a drilling moratorium and other action
  • The shale industry in Philadelphia, including the Mariner East pipeline, the Delaware River’s port system, LNG, natural gas liquids, Bakken crude transport by rail, and action campaigns!

Organizers of both events:

DELAWARE RIVERKEEPER NETWORK * PROTECTING OUR WATERS *PENNENVIRONMENT * CLEAN AIR COUNCIL * BERKS GAS TRUTH

To see the list of over 60 endorsing organizations, Freedom from FrackingConference Schedule, and more, go to: shalegasoutrage.wordpress.com

###

Download the advisory here:

SGO3 Second Media Advisory


Media Advisory, September 12, 2013

MEDIA ADVISORY

Contact:

Tracy Carluccio, Delaware Riverkeeper Network, 215.692.2329

Iris Marie Bloom, Protecting Our Waters, 215.840.6489

Karen Feridun, Berks Gas Truth, 610.678.7726

Adam Garber, PennEnvironment, 267.515.1220

SHALE GAS OUTRAGE TO EXPOSE THE TRUE COST OF FRACKING WITH WATER DRIVE AND CONFERENCE

 

PRESS CONFERENCE Thursday, September 26th 2013

When: 9:30 AM – 10:30 AM including speakers, Q and A, Water Drive send-off Where: Arch Street Methodist Church, 55 N. Broad Street, Philadelphia PA 19107

SHALE GAS OUTRAGE WATER DRIVE, SEPT. 24th – 26th

While shale industry insiders and public officials meet inside the Philadelphia Convention Center from September 24th through September 26th, anti-fracking organizations will be outside collecting jugs of water and cash contributions to purchase water for Pennsylvanians who have lost their water to drilling operations.

Where:  Arch St. United Methodist Church, Philadelphia, PA 19107

When: Starts September 24th at 12pm; concludes on September 26th at 10:30am when the water is sent to impacted Pennsylvanians

Visuals: Donated water jugs marked with messages from donors; signs, banners, volunteers loading water onto a truck, residents impacted by fracking

FREEDOM FROM FRACKING CONFERENCE, SEPT. 26th

What: The conference theme is the True Cost of Fracking. Panels and keynotes will focus on the toxic impacts of shale gas development in Pennsylvania and beyond, and how we can stop it.

Where: Friends Center, 1501 Cherry Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107

When: 2 p.m. to 8 PM on Thursday, September 26th

Keynote speaker: John Fenton is a Pavillion, Wyoming rancher whose water was impacted by fracking. The impacts on his land and life were poignantly captured by director Josh Fox in his Gasland documentaries. Fenton will advocate for the EPA’s investigation into water contamination in Pavillion, abruptly stopped earlier this year, to be reopened.

Conference sessions will include: ·

  • Understanding the economic costs of fracking ·
  • Health impacts of fracking ·
  • Reports from people in impacted communities ·
  • Air, climate, & health impacts of shale gas infrastructure and possible solutions
  • The need for a drilling moratorium and other action ·
  • The gas industry in Philadelphia and the Delaware River’s port system – LNG and more  

###

Organizers of both events:

DELAWARE RIVERKEEPER NETWORK * PROTECTING OUR WATERS * PENNENVIRONMENT * CLEAN AIR COUNCIL * BERKS GAS TRUTH

 

To see the list of over 40 endorsing organizations, Freedom from Fracking Conference Schedule, and more, go to:shalegasoutrage.wordpress.com

Download the advisory here:

SGO3 First Media Advisory_ Final


2012 Shale Gas Outrage press materials

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